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American Veterinary Epidemiology Society Announces 2018 K.F. Meyer/James H. Steele Gold Headed Cane and Honorary Diploma Awards Today - Monday, July 16, 2018

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American Veterinary Epidemiology Society

Sole Sponsor of the AVES since 1964
Hartz Sponsership

July 16, 2018Today, the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) http://www.avesociety.org/ meets at the American Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA) convention in Denver, Colorado to announce and present the coveted/prestigious 2018 K.F. Meyer/James H. Steele Gold Headed Cane and Honorary Diploma awards http://avesociety.org/awards/gold-headed-cane.  This year’s awards to be presented by AVES President, Dr. Craig N. Carter, director and professor of epidemiology http://www.uky.edu/coldstream/News/craig-carter-named-president-american-veterinary-epidemiology-society at the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory http://vdl.uky.edu/Home.aspx.   

 

AVES Mission and Vision Statements:

“The mission of the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) is to advance the field of veterinary epidemiology and public health in the spirit of One Health through educational symposia and the recognition of leaders and students.

The vision of the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society (AVES) is to help improve the quality of life for all people and animals through the science-based One Health principles as fathered and embraced by Drs. Karl F. Meyer and James H. Steele.”

The American Veterinary Medical Association, founded in 1863, is a not-for-profit association representing more than 91,000 U.S. veterinarians working in private and corporate practice, government, industry, academia, and uniformed services. Wikipedia


Editorial: The British Medical Journal, "Healthy people, healthy animals, and a healthy environment: One Health" - Friday, July 13, 2018

NEWS

 
 

Healthy people, healthy animals, and a healthy environment: One Health

The BMJ

Healthy people, healthy animals, and a healthy environment: One Health ... When deciding on a theme to mark Vet Record's 130th year, One Health ...

 

 

 

 


Harmful algal blooms are a One Health issue... - Thursday, July 12, 2018

What's New in One Health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases | One Health Office

If it's green, don't go in graphicSummer is often a time for picnics, ballgames, and backyard fun. But it’s also when algae and cyanobacteria are more likely to overgrow in rivers, lakes, and oceans, resulting in harmful algal blooms (HABs).

HABs are a One Health issue because they can produce poisons that are dangerous to people, animals, and the environment. HABs can contaminate the environment, drinking water, recreational water, and food. Exposure to HAB toxins through water, food, or air may cause a range of mild to severe symptoms in both humans and animals.

CDC and partners are working to learn more about HABs and how to prevent and control the illnesses they can cause.

Updated health promotion materials are now available from CDC to help raise awareness about HABs this summer:

Learn more about HABs

 

Find updates about One Health, diseases spread between humans and animals, new infographics, and much more on our homepage.


Sitting Down With… [Dr.] Richard M. Linnehan, Veterinarian/Astronaut, Houston, USA - The Pathologist, June 2018 ["...how important the concept of ONE HEALTH is..." - Sunday, July 08, 2018

https://thepathologist.com/fileadmin/_processed_/0/a/csm_TP_Issue_0618cover_8d5c769654.png

 

About this Article, Published in Issue #0618 SEE:  https://thepathologist.com/issues/0618/the-astropathologist/

The Pathologist’s June issue covers what we gain from death! We speak to a team of experts behind human decomposition facilities to dig into how the dead can breathe life into research and provide vital forensic clues. We also delve into measuring the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, detecting malaria in mosquitoes with NIRS, how AI can aid healthcare, using methylation biomarkers to assist prognosis, the lab of the future, and much more. Plus, we sit down with astronaut and veterinary pathologist Richard M. Linnehan to discuss his career on and off the planet.

Sitting Down With… [Dr.] Richard M. Linnehan, Veterinarian/Astronaut, Houston, USA

“... When you look down at our planet from space, you realize that everything that seems so big and infinite… isn’t. It made me realize just how important the concept of “One Health” is. For instance, I’m a veterinarian, so I do comparative pathology – avian, reptile, amphibian, mammalian, human, even invertebrate – but most healthcare professionals focus only on humans. “One Health” brings us back to the idea that it’s all connected. Disease entities don’t stick to a single organism or environment; they move between them. The planet is smaller than we think. It’s a closed ecosystem, and everything that lives will eventually, in some way, affect everything else. ...”

June 2018

 

What initially prompted you to study veterinary pathology?

I was always interested in disease processes and epidemiology, but what sparked my interest in veterinary medicine was working for a local equine and large animal veterinarian in high school. I thought it was really cool that a human could actually help animals that big. I was interested in human medicine, too, but I was so intrigued by the veterinary side – especially exotic animals – that I decided to take that route.

I did my veterinary residency in comparative pathology and exotic animal medicine, and then did research and clinical work with zoo animals for several years. My main interest, even then, was in marine mammals and related ecosystems. I met the head of the US Navy’s marine mammal program while in veterinary school, and I wanted to be the program’s main veterinarian. Even though I had stayed in touch and geared my residency and extracurricular activities toward marine mammal work, I couldn’t believe it when I got the job!

The program involved training teams of sea lions and dolphins to perform underwater searches – they were much better than human divers. The animals were never in danger, of course; we just relied on them to detect and report potential hazards. In fact, they were better taken care of medically and nutritionally than most people! We also did some pretty cool research – studies on reproduction, longevity, nutrition, and many other things.

How did that lead to a career as an astronaut?

Before I applied to veterinary school, the only other thing I had ever wanted to be was a fighter pilot. I was accepted into the Air Force and veterinary school at the same time, and my advisor convinced me to choose the latter. During my studies, I used to watch the shuttle launches and ask myself, “How can I still fly?” And I figured that, if the space program was sending up mission specialists, doctors, physicists, and geologists, they’d need a veterinarian as well.

I interviewed with them (for which I can thank my experience as a deploying military marine mammal veterinarian) and, in 1992, they called me to say, “Would you like to be an astronaut?” Well – of course I would!

When you look down at our planet from space, you realize that everything that seems so big and infinite… isn’t. It made me realize just how important the concept of “One Health” is. For instance, I’m a veterinarian, so I do comparative pathology – avian, reptile, amphibian, mammalian, human, even invertebrate – but most healthcare professionals focus only on humans. “One Health” brings us back to the idea that it’s all connected. Disease entities don’t stick to a single organism or environment; they move between them. The planet is smaller than we think. It’s a closed ecosystem, and everything that lives will eventually, in some way, affect everything else.

What was your role on your missions?

My first mission, STS-78, was a life and microgravity sciences mission in the Spacelab where we looked at how various biological processes work in space. We looked at the differences in how biological systems function in zero or microgravity versus normal gravity. Everything that has ever lived on Earth has evolved in a 1 G gravity field, so when you take that away, how do things respond?

The second flight – STS-90, or Neurolab – was much more involved. We were looking at nervous system disturbances brought on by spaceflight. We had a vast array of animals – crickets, rodents, even oyster toadfish. Fish are kind of wild because their neutral buoyancy means that they live in a pseudo-microgravity environment – but they rely on gravity to tell them up from down. So how do they maintain buoyancy and navigation in space?

We also liked to joke that we had four big primates on board on whom we performed most of our experiments – us. I was pleased to have the opportunity to use my veterinary degree and pathology training to help the future survival of humanity. If we can’t figure out how to keep humans healthy and strong in space, then we’re not going to go. We won’t travel long distances to other planets, because by the time we get there, we’re going to be so unhealthy and so discombobulated that we won’t be able to function. I hope our operational studies will one day help humans take to the stars.

My final two missions were not life sciences-related, and allowed me to venture into the world of spacewalking. On STS-109, we rendezvoused with, repaired, and upgraded the Hubble Space Telescope. That was an awesome flight experience and a great mission. My last flight, STS-123, was to the International Space Station, where I and my spacewalk team helped build the space station. We installed the Japanese laboratory, called Kibo, and a giant robot called the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator that moves around the station and replaces worn-out parts.

What do you think is the most underrepresented aspect of pathology?

I think it’s comparative pathology – the link between disease processes in humans, animals, and the environment. We haven’t thought about it as much as we should because we’re too focused on our own species, so we don’t always consider that the same organisms and errors cause problems to other species as well, even though the presentations may be different to our own. We must remember that it’s all interrelated.

Permission to reprint granted to the One Health Initiative website July 8, 2018 by:

Michael Schubert, Editor | Texere Publishing Limited, t: 01565 745 193 | www.thepathologist.com


June 8, 2018—American Public Health Association (APHA) Organizations’ letter to U.S. Congress Appropriations Committee leaders in support of strong investments in antimicrobial resistance in FY 2019 appropriations bills using ONE HEALTH APPROACH - Saturday, July 07, 2018

June 8, 2018—American Public Health Association (APHA) Organizations’ letter to U.S. Congress Appropriations Committee leaders in support of strong investments in antimicrobial resistance in FY 2019 appropriations bills using ONE HEALTH APPROACH

 SEE: https://goo.gl/kaai5a

3rd paragraph,

“The report also highlights the need for continued and robust funding for AMR given that nationwide testing last year documented 221 cases of so-called “nightmare bacteria,” that can spread resistance to last-resort antibiotics. Robust, sustained investment in multi-agency One Health efforts is vital to combat AMR domestically and globally including prevention, antimicrobial stewardship, surveillance and data collection, research, and development of urgently needed new products including antimicrobial drugs, diagnostics, vaccines and alternative treatments.”

 

11th paragraph,

“Food and Drug Administration and US Department of Agriculture Experts agree that a One Health approach, including both human and animal health, is essential for combating antimicrobial resistance. We urge funding of $54 million for the Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria initiative at FDA to support FDA’s efforts to address public health concerns associated with antimicrobial drug use in animals, and better protect antibiotic effectiveness for both human and animal populations. This funding is needed now more than ever, with estimates that antibiotic use in humans and livestock will rise by 50% before 2030. FDA would be able to better collaborate with consumers, producers, veterinarians, and other agencies to monitor AMR through the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) as well as other initiatives by the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine to address AMR.”

Notably, see list of prominent organizational signatories:

Accelerate Diagnostics, Inc.

AdvaMedDx

Alliance for Aging Research

Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics

American Academy of Pediatrics

American Association of Avian Pathologists

American Association of Bovine Practitioners

American Public Health Association

American Society of Transplant Surgeons

American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

American Thoracic Society

American Veterinary Medical Association

Antibiotic Resistance Action Center, the George Washington University

Antimicrobials Working Group (Amplyx Pharmaceuticals, Aridis Pharmaceuticals, Arsanis Inc., Cidara Therapeutics Inc., ContraFect Corporation, Iterum Therapeutics Ltd., Melinta Therapeutics Inc., Motif Bio plc, Nabriva Therapeutics US Inc., Paratek Pharmaceuticals Inc., SCYNEXIS Inc., Spero Therapeutics, Inc., T2 Biosystems Inc., Theravance Biopharma U.S. Inc., Viamet, Vical Incorporated, and Zavante Therapeutics Inc.)

Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology

Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials

Becton Dickinson and Co. (BD)

bioMerieux

Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO)

Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy

Center for Foodborne Illness Research and Prevention

Clinician Champions in Comprehensive Antibiotic Stewardship

Consumer Federation of America

Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists

Da Volterra

Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention

Emory Antibiotic Resistance Center

Food Animal Concerns Trust

GlaxoSmithKline

Global Health Council

Health Care Without Harm

HIV Medicine Association

Immune Deficiency Foundation

Infectious Diseases Society of America

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Making-A-Difference in Infectious Diseases

March of Dimes

National Association of County and City Health Officials

National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners

NovaDigm Therapeutics, Inc.

Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

Peggy Lillis Foundation

Sepsis Alliance

Society of Critical Care Medicine

Society of Infectious Diseases Pharmacists

Spero Therapeutics

The Fecal Transplant Foundation

The Gerontological Society of America

The Pew Charitable Trusts

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

The Society of Critical Care Medicine

Treatment Action Group

Trust for America's Health


All for One - "... one example of how human, animal, and environmental health are intricately linked, forming the basis for One Health" - Friday, July 06, 2018

http://www.brownmedicinemagazine.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/cover-spring.png

A magazine for alumni and friends of the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.
All for One

SEE: http://www.brownmedicinemagazine.org/blog/all-for-one/

By Alice H. Tin, MD, MPH, Family Medicine with Obstetrics - Resident Physician, Swedish Cherry Hill Family Medicine Residency Class of 2021, ICHS | International District Clinic

“… This is merely one example of how human, animal, and environmental health are intricately linked, forming the basis for One Health. One Health is infused into many courses. For my final paper I wrote about Nipah virus, a pathogen discovered in Malaysia in 1998. Fruit bats are a natural reservoir for the virus, and new pig farms encroaching on bat habitat brought human, livestock, and wild animals into closer proximity, inciting a spillover event. The epidemic had local and international economic consequences: 1 million pigs were culled with no financial compensation to farmers, and importation of Malaysian pigs was temporarily banned. One Health provided a framework to weave infectious diseases, virology, animal behavior, ecology, climate change, international trade, and economics together into a cohesive narrative about the emergence of Nipah virus. I was enthralled by this new paradigm, and eager to seek out other examples of One Health in practice.

In medical school I was selected to be the human health domain student representative to the executive board of the One Health Commission, a nonprofit that creates networking opportunities between professionals in various fields. I also founded the student group One Health at Brown, the first One Health group at any medical school. We hosted lectures on non-verbal communication by the Roger Williams Park Zoo vet, and joint animal vaccination and preventive health clinics with the Providence Animal Rescue League in low-income housing complexes. We piloted a program with community organizations that matched formerly homeless individuals with companion animals to promote housing stability.

In my fourth year I worked with Peter Rabinowitz, MD, MPH, at the University of Washington’s Center for One Health, to create a clinical One Health elective in Seattle to explore its relevance in everyday practice. I observed surgery on a gorilla, with both veterinarian and physician consultants; developed an animal exposure history tool and tested it in an occupational health clinic; and discussed compassion fatigue with animal lab workers. ...”


What's New in One Health -- CONNECTING HUMAN, ANIMAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH June 2018 - Thursday, June 28, 2018

What's New in One Health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases | One Health Office

Cote d'Ivoire ReportCDC’s One Health Office works with countries and partners around the globe to prioritize zoonotic diseases of greatest national concern. CDC experts lead One Health Zoonotic Disease Prioritization Workshops for countries that want to prioritize a list of their most urgent zoonotic disease threats.

These workshops bring together experts from many different areas who work to protect the health of people, animals, and the environment. Workshop participants collaborate to identify a country’s top zoonotic diseases to target for One Health collaborations and develop strategies to tackle the newly prioritized zoonotic diseases.

A new report from Côte d'Ivoire's workshop is now available. The report is also available in French. Other workshop reports are available on CDC’s One Health website.

Read the report

 

Find updates about One Health, diseases spread between humans and animals, new infographics, and much more on our homepage.


"Canaries in the coal mine" - Dr. Tracey McNamara comments - Tuesday, June 26, 2018

A One Health approach could help save your life...if the powers-that-be start thinking and acting ‘outside the box’!

SEE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qm8NnL582uc


WONCA (World Organization of Family Doctors [physicians]) http://www.globalfamilydoctor.com/ Reiterates Recognition/Support of One Health Principles in June 22, 2018 Newsletter to members - Friday, June 22, 2018

WONCA (World Organization of Family Doctors [physicians]) http://www.globalfamilydoctor.com/ Reiterates Recognition/Support of One Health Principles in June 22, 2018 Newsletter to members ...

 “ ... WONCA and One Health Initiative
For a number of years WONCA has supported the aims and objectives of the One Health Initiative. The mission statement of the Initiative is:

Recognizing that human health (including mental health via the human-animal bond phenomenon), animal health, and ecosystem health are inextricably linked, One Health seeks to promote, improve, and defend the health and well-being of all species by enhancing cooperation and collaboration between physicians, veterinarians, other scientific health and environmental professionals and by promoting strengths in leadership and management to achieve these goals.

This has increasing relevance in today’s complex interaction between man, animals and the environment, as evidenced by the spread of antimicrobial resistance and the emergence and re-emergence of vector-borne and zoonotic infections. To find out more about One Health go to their website at: http://www.onehealthinitiative.com...”
 
Note: Dr. Garth Manning [MB BCh BAO, DRCOG, DAvMed, MRCGP, FRCGP], Chief Executive Officer (CEO) World Organization of Family Doctors [physicians] (WONCA), (Thailand)] is a member of the OHI team Advisory Board http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/advBoard.php.


Heart Disease, an important “One Health” approach issue for comparative medicine research - Thursday, June 21, 2018

Heart Disease, an important “One Health” approach issue for comparative medicine research...worth repeating:

The One Health Concept: How Multidisciplinary Training and Collaboration Leads to Major Advances in Health Care” endorsement by one of the principle discoverers of the First Balloon-Expandable Coronary Stent, Gary S. Roubin, DVM, MD, PhD, Medical Director, Cardiovascular Associates of the Southeast, 3980 Colonnade Parkway, Birmingham. AL 35243
https://goo.gl/cZ61UE


 

Renowned Physician Interventional Cardiologist Endorses One Health Concept – Posted One Health Initiative website Tuesday, September 05, 2017

Renowned Physician Interventional Cardiologist Endorses One Health Concept

 

The One Health Concept: How Multidisciplinary Training and Collaboration Leads to Major Advances in Health Care

A One Health endorsement message from Gary S. Roubin, BVSc. (Hons.), MB, BS., PhD, MD, FRACP, FACC, FAHA, FSCAI

Cardiovascular Associates of the Southeast Birmingham, Alabama

Please see http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/The%20One%20Health%20concept%20is%20a%20worldwide%20strategy%20for%20expanding%20interdisciplinary%20collaborations%20and%20communications%20in%20all%20aspects%20of%20health%20care%20for%20humans.pdf or https://goo.gl/cZ61UE.

 

“The One Health, One Medicine philosophy of multidisciplinary collaboration has the extraordinary potential to expand scientific knowledge and innovation in health care. This collaboration can improve the longevity and quality of life for millions of patients. There is marked synergy between animal and human health. The way scientific collaboration between the Veterinary and the Medical community can improve patient care is well illustrated by the development of the First Balloon Expandable Coronary Stent. *

The writer was fortunate to have completed a 5-year Veterinary Medical Degree followed 1-year later by a 5-year Medical Degree at the University of Queensland, Australia. Following clinical training that culminated in specialist qualifications in Cardiovascular Diseases, he completed his education with a PhD in Cardiac Hemodynamics at Sydney University, Australia.

 

A National Heart Foundation Fellowship took him to Emory University in Atlanta Georgia USA to work with Professor Andreas Gruentzig – the pioneer of Coronary Balloon Angioplasty. Coronary angioplasty was plagued by the shortcoming abrupt vessel collapse and closure complicating this potentially valuable procedure.

 

The writer’s multidisciplinary skills facilitated successful research in multiple animal species and disease models. He collaborated closely with fellow veterinarians at Emory University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

 

This work culminated in the development of the first balloon expandable coronary stent and first FDA approved coronary stent in 1994. The innovative, early clinical work and the scientific foundation of the preclinical animal studies was the underpinning for a medical procedure that has been used in hundreds of millions of patients since its introduction.

 

Coronary stenting revolutionized coronary intervention - saving lives in patients with unstable coronary syndromes and improving quality of life in countless others.

Utilizing his multidisciplinary Veterinary and Medical skills the writer has gone on to develop devices for stenting of the carotid artery, embolic protection filters for the brain and devices for closing large bore access punctures in arteries.

There can be no doubt about the unique potential for the One Health Model for Multidisciplinary Training and Collaboration.”

 

*The First Balloon-Expandable Coronary Stent: An expedition that Changed Cardiovascular Medicine.: Roubin, Gary: University of Queensland Press 2014

[https://www.amazon.com/First-Balloon-Expandable-Coronary-Stent-Cardiovascular-ebook/dp/B00QEGEQXG]

Gary S. Roubin, MD, PhD

(917) 217 6070.
garyroubin@aol.com

Medical Director

Cardiovascular Associates of the Southeast

3980 Colonnade Parkway

Birmingham. AL 35243 groubin@cvapc.com

(205) 510 5000

 

Provided by Dr. Gary S. Roubin to the One Health Initiative team’s website September 4, 2017 via Bruce Kaplan, DVM https://goo.gl/XwQMfw, and Peter G. Anderson, DVM, PhD, University of Alabama (USA) School of Medicine http://apps.medicine.uab.edu/FacultyDirectory/FacultyData.asp?FID=19493

Note: Dr. Roubin and his colleagues’ notable One Health achievement, i.e. development of the First Balloon-Expandable Coronary Stent, was first reported by the One Health Initiative team in the One Health Initiative website February 9, 2010 https://goo.gl/xjnr9Z.

 

 

 


 

 


 
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