One Health News

 
Search News:
 
Found 145 Matching Results. View current News Here.

Use of a Reduced (4-Dose) Vaccine Schedule for Postexposure Prophylaxis to Prevent Human Rabies - U.S. CDC/MMWR (March 19, 2010) - Sunday, March 28, 2010

Use of a Reduced (4-Dose) Vaccine Schedule for Postexposure Prophylaxis to Prevent Human Rabies

Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – Morbidity and Mortality Report - March 19, 2010 / 59(02);1-9

 

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5902a1.htm


Pappaioanou: Veterinary Crisis Has Implications for Human Health - Monday, March 15, 2010

 Pappaioanou: Veterinary Crisis Has Implications for Human Health [USA]

By Dr. Marguerite Pappaioanou
Special to Roll Call

March 11, 2010, 2:41 p.m.

Please see ‘Roll Call’:

 http://www.rollcall.com/news/44112-1.html

 Marguerite Pappaioanou, DVM, MPVM, PhD, DACVPM is:

 

Executive Director, American Association of Veterinary Medical Colleges

Washington, D. C.

 


Human-Animal Medicine - Clinical Approaches to Zoonoses and Other Shared Health Risks - Friday, March 12, 2010

Important REMINDER: Groundbreaking ‘One Health’ book now available: 

 

Landmark ‘One Health’ book receives favorable review

 

"For public health professionals, human health and veterinary clinicians in the United States this book will be a must-read. Furthermore, I should recommend this book for all libraries of medicine, veterinary and public health schools and research centres from all over the world. This book will bring together human and animal clinicians and provide practical guidelines towards a better understanding on human-animal interactions and their potential effects on the health and well being of humans and animals."

 

 

Book review    
Review of "Human-Animal Medicine - Clinical Approaches to Zoonoses and Other Shared Health Risks" by Peter M. Rabinowitz and Lisa A. Conti (eds.)
Filipe Dantas-Torres
Parasites & Vectors 2010, 3:20 (19 March 2010)

 [Abstract]

-  PDF http://www.parasitesandvectors.com/content/3/1/20

http://www.parasitesandvectors.com/content/3/1/20

 

“Human-Animal Medicine: Clinical Approaches to Zoonoses, Toxicants and Other Shared Health Risks”

 

http://www.amazon.com/Human-Animal-Medicine-Clinical-Approaches-Toxicants/dp/1416068376/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264519064&sr=1-1

 

http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookbibliographicinfo.cws_home/720333/description

 

 

 

 

Approx. 528 pages
Trim size 8 3/4 X 11 1/16 in
Copyright 2010
List Price: $99.95, Hardcover, Reference

Availability: PUBLISHED
Release Date: 12/18/2009


Princeton University (USA) Program of Science and Global Security: The Biosecurity Seminar Series Spring 2009 - Friday, March 12, 2010

Princeton University (USA) – Program of Science and Global Security

 

The Biosecurity Seminar Series – Spring 2009

 

All seminars were held at the Carl Icahn building in Princeton, New Jersey (USA)

Any questions, please contact Laura Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP at lkahn@princeton.edu or 609-258-6763.

http://www.princeton.edu/sgs/seminars/biosecurity/

 

Notable Example:

March 27, 2009-Smallpox Eradication: What it Taught Us or Did It?"

Speaker: D.A. Henderson, MD, MPH, Professor, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine; Resident Scholar at the Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center; former Dean of Johns Hopkins School of Public Health from 1977 to 1990; Directed WHO global smallpox eradication program 1966-1977

link to view videotape of 3/27/09 seminar


The One Health Initiative Website Welcomes Worldwide One Health Submissions for Posting - Sunday, March 07, 2010

NOTICE (March 15, 2010):

 

The One Health Initiative Website Welcomes …

 

Worldwide One Health Submissions for Posting on:

 

·                         One Health News page

·                         Publications page

·                         Upcoming Events page

 Comments and suggestions also appreciated...

 

Please send to kkm@onehealthinitiative.com


University of Florida (USA) offers Unique Online Master of Public Health Degree to Busy Professionals - Saturday, March 06, 2010

University of Florida (USA) offers Unique Online Master of Public Health Degree to Busy Professionals

--e.g., physicians, veterinarians, nurses, researchers, pharmacists, dentists, health department employees and others--

The Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges has identified a need for veterinarians to be trained in public health.

Now practicing veterinarians can earn a Master of Public Health degree from the University of Florida without having to give up your practice or come to the UF campus. 

The University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions has been delivering online public health programs since 2006 to veterinarians, physicians, nurses, researchers, pharmacists, dentists, health department employees, as well as many other professionals in a variety of fields.  In this program you will learn valuable public health skills, interact with UF faculty and meet other professional learners. Click here for students’ comments about our online courses. (www.online.mph.ufl.edu/testimonials)

The program can be completed in as little as two years or may be completed on a part-time basis to fit your work and personal schedule.  The beauty of our MPH online program is that the course material is available for you to explore 24 hours a day with minimal real-time sessions.  Also, tuition is the same for in-state and out-of-state students, so no matter where you are you can be part of the Gator Nation at in-state rates!

Please review our Web site at www.online.mph.ufl.edu to learn about the exciting features of our program, including:

• Two options for program length, depending on prior degrees
• A curriculum designed to provide competence in essential public health service areas
• A range of contemporary courses in epidemiology, environmental health, health management, health policy, biostatistics, and the social and behavioral sciences, with a focus on applications to public health practice
• The most up-to-date and user-friendly software
• Detailed online handbooks to guide academic and technical applications
• Ongoing opportunities to interact with course faculty and technical support staff
• Integrative internship experiences tailored to individual goals
• Optional opportunities to visit the UF campus and interact with other MPH students and faculty

For more information about how the online UF MPH program works and how to apply, check out our website at www.online.mph.ufl.edu.  If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Susan White at 352-273-5367 or swhite@ufl.edu.


Wildlife Diseases News Digest - Spreads One Health Message - Friday, March 05, 2010

Wildlife Diseases News Digest

(One of the essential elements of One Health)

   

 Spreads One Health Message using One Health Initiative website

 

Please see: http://wdin.blogspot.com/2010/03/in-spotlight-one-health-initative.html


Insightful Book Interview with: One Health Leader Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP - Wednesday, March 03, 2010

Princeton Community Television  -  Princeton, New Jersey (USA)

 

http://vimeo.com/9712129 - Online audio-video, 24 minutes duration

 

Insightful Book Interview with: One Health Leader Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP

 

Author of “Who's In Charge? Leadership during Epidemics, Bioterror Attacks, and Other Public Health Crises”

http://www.greenwood.com/catalog/C9485.aspx

http://www.amazon.com/Whos-Charge-Leadership-Epidemics-International/dp/0275994856/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1259598191&sr=8-1 


Cost of Foodborne Illness per Produce Safety Project - Food-borne illnesses cost USA $152 billion - Wednesday, March 03, 2010

Produce Safety Project

http://www.producesafetyproject.org/

Cost of Foodborne Illness

Food-borne illnesses cost USA $152 billion

http://www.producesafetyproject.org/fact_sheets?id=0001

PDF version

In addition to sickness, discomfort, and death, foodborne illnesses carry with them significant economic and social costs that extend far beyond the immediate victim.

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that foodborne diseases cause approximately 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and 5,000 deaths in the United States each year.1
  • For every foodborne illness case that is reported, as many as 40 more illnesses are not reported or lab-confirmed.
  • More than 30 million people in the United States are likely to be particularly susceptible to foodborne disease.  Very young, elderly, and immune-compromised persons experience the most serious foodborne illnesses.3
  • It is estimated that chronic, secondary complications resulting from foodborne illness occur in 2-3 percent of cases.4
  • The Economic Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates the annual costs of medical care, productivity losses, and premature deaths due to foodborne illnesses caused by the five major pathogens to be $6.9 billion.5  

1HHS, CDC, Food Safety Office, available here.
2This multiplier reflects the estimates developed by a number of different sources. See Andrew C. Voetsch et al., "FoodNet Estimate of the Burden of Illness Caused by Nontyphoidal Salmonella Infections in the United States." Clinical Infectious Diseases 38, no. Suppl 3 (2004): S127-S134, available
here; P Mead et al., Food-related illness and death in the United States, Emerg Infect Dis 1999; 5607-25 (multiplier of 38); and RB Chalker and MJ Blaser. A review of human salmonellosis. III. Magnitude of Salmonella Infection in the United States. Rev Infect Dis 1988;10:111-24. 
3Council for Agricultural Science and Technology. “Foodborne Pathogens: Risks and Consequences.” Task Force Report No. 122, (1994).
4Council for Agricultural Science and Technology, (1994).
5S.R. Crutchfield, T. Roberts, “Food Safety Efforts Accelerate in the 1990s.” 23 FoodReview 44: 49 (2000


Veterinary Practice News - "Researcher Combines Computers, Biology to Track Flu" - Monday, March 01, 2010

Veterinary Practice News

Researcher Combines Computers, Biology to Track Flu

Posted: Thursday, February 25, 2010, 6:15 p.m. EST

An assistant professor in systems biology at Mississippi State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine has combined computers and biology to track animal flu viruses.

During graduate studies in China, Henry Wan, DVM, MS, Ph.D., became the first scientist to isolate the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus, according to MSU. Shortly after, highly pathogenic H5N1 outbreaks occurred in poultry in Asia, Europe and Africa …

SEE http://www.veterinarypracticenews.com/vet-breaking-news/2010/02/25/researcher-combines-computers-biology-to-track-flu.aspx

 


 
One Health Initiative
Home | About One Health | Mission Statement | One Health News | AVMA Task Force Report | One Health Newsletter |
Publications | Supporters | Supporter Endorsements | Upcoming Events | Contact Us