One Health Publications


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One Health Happenings! February 2018
U.S. One Health Commission
Tuesday, February 13, 2018.

http://files.constantcontact.com/6661a670501/265b64bb-d131-4aad-8ad2-bce7d5a2b6d7.png?a=1129968538142

 

One Health Happenings!  http://conta.cc/2EAh0ct 

 

 


Top epidemic-prone diseases without sufficient counter measures
World Health Organization (WHO) - Feb 12 2018
Tuesday, February 13, 2018.

“The value of a One Health approach was stressed, including a parallel prioritization processes for animal health. Such an effort would support research and development to prevent and control animal diseases minimising spill-over and enhancing food security. The possible utility of animal vaccines for preventing public health emergencies was also noted.”

 

http://www.who.int/blueprint/priority-diseases/en/#.WoHmhcOoiSg.twitter

Top epidemic-prone diseases without sufficient counter measures

http://www.who.int/entity/hac/donorinfo/highlights/Listofpathogensbp.jpg

12 February 2018 – World Health Organization (WHO) releases its 2018 list of priority pathogens that have the potential to cause a public health emergency and which have no, or insufficient, countermeasures. WHO calls on the medical community to unite in greater R&D efforts for these 8 diseases to develop treatments and vaccines to help control outbreaks.


Investing in One Health
The World Bank Group
Tuesday, February 13, 2018.

Policy Brief

Investing in One Health

A concerted approach to address shared risks to humans, animals,

and the environment


iCOMOS 2018 - International Conference on One Medicine One Science - Minneapolis, MN (USA) April 29-May 2, 2018
Tuesday, February 13, 2018.

iCOMOS 2018 - International Conference on One Medicine One Science - Minneapolis, MN (USA) April 29-May 2, 2018

 

See complete program: http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/publications/One%20Health%20Init%20Ad%20021318.pdf

 

Science and Policy at the Interface of Environment, Agriculture, and Medicine

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

 

Explore new ways to solve pressing health issues, facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations, and promote science's role in influencing public policy at the interface of humans, animals, and the environment.

 


ONE HEALTH at ScienceDirect.com - OPEN ACCESS Articles
Monday, February 12, 2018.

One Health

ScienceDirect.com

Read the latest articles of One Health at ScienceDirect.com, Elsevier's leading platform of peer-reviewed scholarly literature.

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 Open-Access

https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/one-health/vol/1


Top epidemic-prone diseases without sufficient counter measures
World Health Organization (WHO)
Monday, February 12, 2018.

“The value of a One Health approach was stressed, including a parallel prioritization processes for animal health. Such an effort would support research and development to prevent and control animal diseases minimising spill-over and enhancing food security. The possible utility of animal vaccines for preventing public health emergencies was also noted.”

 

http://www.who.int/blueprint/priority-diseases/en/#.WoHmhcOoiSg.twitter

Top epidemic-prone diseases without sufficient counter measures

http://www.who.int/entity/hac/donorinfo/highlights/Listofpathogensbp.jpg

12 February 2018 – World Health Organization (WHO) releases its 2018 list of priority pathogens that have the potential to cause a public health emergency and which have no, or insufficient, countermeasures. WHO calls on the medical community to unite in greater R&D efforts for these 8 diseases to develop treatments and vaccines to help control outbreaks.


Vaccines for zoonoses: a one Health paradigm
SciTech Europa
Friday, February 09, 2018.

Scitech EuropaSciTech Europa

 


Special Issue "Canine Rabies Surveillance, Control and Elimination" - Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2018
Friday, February 02, 2018.

Special Issue "Canine Rabies Surveillance, Control and Elimination"

SEE: Special Issue on Rabies (http://www.mdpi.com/journal/vetsci/special_issues/rabies)

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2018

Share This Special Issue

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor

Dr. Ricardo Castillo-Neyra

Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 715 Blockley Hall, 423 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: epidemiology; One Health; tropical diseases; veterinary public health; zoonoses


Of dogs and hookworms: manís best friend and his parasites as a model for translational biomedical research
Open-Access: Parasites & Vectors201811:59
Thursday, February 01, 2018.

Of dogs and hookworms: man’s best friend and his parasites as a model for translational biomedical research

Catherine Shepherd1Email author, Phurpa Wangchuk1 and Alex Loukas1Email author - Open-Access: Parasites & Vectors201811:59 https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-018-2621-2 ©  The Author(s) Published: 25 January 2018

Abstract

We present evidence that the dog hookworm (Ancylostoma caninum) is underutilised in the study of host-parasite interactions, particularly as a proxy for the human-hookworm relationship. The inability to passage hookworms through all life stages in vitro means that adult stage hookworms have to be harvested from the gut of their definitive hosts for ex vivo research. This makes study of the human-hookworm interface difficult for technical and ethical reasons. The historical association of humans, dogs and hookworms presents a unique triad of positive evolutionary pressure to drive the A. caninum-canine interaction to reflect that of the human-hookworm relationship. Here we discuss A. caninum as a proxy for human hookworm infection and situate this hookworm model within the current research agenda, including the various ‘omics’ applications and the search for next generation biologics to treat a plethora of human diseases. Historically, the dog hookworm has been well described on a physiological and biochemical level, with an increasing understanding of its role as a human zoonosis. With its similarity to human hookworm, the recent publications of hookworm genomes and other omics databases, as well as the ready availability of these parasites for ex vivo culture, the dog hookworm presents itself as a valuable tool for discovery and translational research.

https://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13071-018-2621-2

 

Also see a “ONE HEALTH” Editorial Published in Parasites and Vectors 2:36 (12 August 2009) entitled 'ONE HEALTH' and parasitology https://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/1756-3305-2-36?site=parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com


Plant-made vaccines and reagents for the One Health initiative
Edward Peter Rybicki, PhD
Saturday, January 27, 2018.

Plant-made vaccines and reagents for the One Health initiative

Edward Peter Rybicki Biopharming Research Unit, Department of Molecular & Cell Biology, University of Cape Town; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa Correspondence ed.rybicki@uct.ac.za
ORCID Iconhttp://orcid.org/0000-0001-8024-9911
ORCID Icon

Pages 2912-2917 | Accepted author version posted online: 28 Aug 2017, Published online: 18 Oct 2017

ABSTRACT

The One Health initiative is increasingly becoming a prominent discussion topic in animal and human health, with its focus on prevention of spread of zoonotic diseases, both in animals, and from animals to humans. An important part of One Health is that diagnostics and vaccines for diseases may be the same thing – and be used for both humans and animals. One potential problem standing in the way of wider adoption of One Health principles, though, is that use of conventional cell fermentation systems for production of the recombinant proteins that could be used as diagnostics or vaccines is often expensive and is not easily scalable. A solution to this may be the use of plants or plant cells as bioreactors: molecular farming, or the production of biologics in plants, is now a well-established science with many proofs of principle and important proofs of efficacy for especially animal vaccines. This review discusses how molecular farming could enable important advances in One Health, using as examples plant-made vacccines, reagents and therapeutics for influenza viruses, ebolaviruses, rabies virus, bunyaviruses and flaviviruses.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21645515.2017.1356497


 
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