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Declaration G20 Meeting of Agriculture Ministers 27-28 July 2018, Buenos Aires, Argentina – See AMR
Tuesday, July 31, 2018.

Declaration G20 Meeting of Agriculture Ministers 27-28 July 2018, Buenos Aires, Argentina – See AMR

VI - ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE (AMR)

31- We emphasize the importance of combating AMR in a "One Health" approach promoting access to affordable and quality antimicrobials, vaccines and diagnostics, based on well-developed national action plans. We recollect the call of the G20 leaders at the 2017 Hamburg Summit to tackle the spread of AMR in humans, animals and the environment.

We will promote interdisciplinary and inter-sectoral approaches, as well as joint actions with the Ministries responsible for human health, animal health, environment and research in order to design national policies and help their implementation by the relevant stakeholders, mainly through "One Health-based" national action plans. Furthermore, we acknowledge the need:

(i) To foster awareness of AMR through dissemination activities and the inclusion in educational curricula for all relevant professions, from initial levels to degree programs.

(ii) To encourage public-private cooperation, supporting the scientific community for the research and development of new antimicrobials as well as new technologies (e.g. rapid diagnostics, vaccines and alternative treatments) that help prevent infection and reduce inappropriate antimicrobial use.

(iii) To promote good practices, preventive measures and health care in order to reduce the need for and optimize the use of antimicrobials in agriculture while striving to restrict it to therapeutic use alone. To foster the prudent and responsible use of antimicrobials, particularly those important for therapeutic use in humans, taking into account WHO's list of critically important antimicrobials for human health and national lists established on the basis of scientific risk assessments carried out taking into account chapter 6.10 of the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code. The prudent and responsible use of antimicrobials does not include their use for the promotion of growth in the absence of a risk analysis conducted in accordance with CAC / GL 77-2011.

(iv) To support multi-disciplinary approaches and ongoing implementation of Global Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance developed by the World Health Organization with the active contribution of the FAO and OIE in the spirit of One Health.

We call on FAO, OIE and WHO to collaborate to improve the prudent use of antimicrobials and on infection prevention to safeguard human and animal health (terrestrial and aquatic), our common food systems, and support scientific collaboration to address knowledge gaps regarding AMR in the environment, in cooperation with other institutions such as UNEP.


Review Zoonoses under our noses
Sunday, July 29, 2018.
Elsevier

Microbes and Infection

Available online 18 June 2018
Microbes and Infection

Review
Zoonoses under our noses

Open Access funded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Abstract

One Health is an effective approach for the management of zoonotic disease in humans, animals and environments. Examples of the management of bacterial zoonoses in Europe and across the globe demonstrate that One Health approaches of international surveillance, information-sharing and appropriate intervention methods are required to successfully prevent and control disease outbreaks in both endemic and non-endemic regions. Additionally, a One Health approach enables effective preparation and response to bioterrorism threats.


Zoonotic Diseases and Phytochemical Medicines for Microbial Infections in Veterinary Science: Current State and Future Perspective
Front. Vet. Sci.
Wednesday, July 25, 2018.

Shin B and Park W (2018) Zoonotic Diseases and Phytochemical Medicines for Microbial Infections in Veterinary Science: Current State and Future Perspective. Front. Vet. Sci. 5:166. doi: 10.3389/fvets.2018.00166

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fvets.2018.00166/full

“...The health of humans and animals has been threatened by increasing resistance to antibiotics, environmental pollution, and the development of chronic diseases (1). It is necessary to understand and use the concept of One Health to effectively control and prevent diseases in the human–animal interface. The concept of One Health is currently advancing with the emergence and spread of epizootics, zoonoses, and epidemics, whereas the risks of pandemics have become an increasing critical challenge (2). Antimicrobial agents have seen general use in human and veterinary medicine for >50 years and have shown tremendous health benefits (3). However, the misuse and overuse of antibiotics generate selective evolutionary pressures that increase the chance of survival of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which puts individuals at risk of becoming infected by drug-resistant bacteria (4). This development of antibiotic resistance renders the antimicrobial therapies ineffective, thus posing a serious public health threat. ...”

 


Pennsylvania Partnerships Strengthen State's Agriculture [includes One Health approach]
Sunday, July 22, 2018.
NEWS  
 
Pennsylvania Partnerships Strengthen State's Agriculture
Safeguarding the health of Pennsylvania's animals, people and the ... dean, is a strong supporter of the One Health initiative and we welcome him to the team. The administration has embraced One Health, bringing Hoffman, State ...

https://www.lancasterfarming.com/news/columnists/pennsylvania-partnerships-strengthen-state-s-agriculture/article_38c07a12-8c27-11e8-be90-277e40d8ad60.html

 

“... On a much broader scale, the PADLS partnership and the three entities it represents—the state, and two world-class research and teaching institutions— all subscribe to the One Health interdisciplinary approach to animal, human and environmental health. Understanding and addressing the health issues created at the intersection of society, the animal world and the environment is the foundation for One Health.

 

I commend the leadership of retiring Dean Joan Hendricks, who fostered this approach at PennVet as dean and as a faculty member for more than 30 years. Andrew Hoffman, the new dean, is a strong supporter of the One Health initiative and we welcome him to the team.

 

The administration has embraced One Health, bringing Hoffman, State Veterinarian David Wolfgang, and Penn State College of Agriculture Dean Rick Roush to the table in a broader coalition that includes the departments of health, environmental protection, conservation and natural resources, and public and private sector human and veterinary health practitioners and researchers. ...”




 


The past, present and future of Wageningen Bioveterinary Research
Health Europa
Saturday, July 21, 2018.

NEWS

 

The past, present and future of Wageningen Bioveterinary Research

Health Europa

Its commitment to One Health, the term given to the inter-relatedness of ... One Health European Joint Programme, an EU initiative aimed at aligning ...

 


One Health Happenings! - July 10, 2018
One Health Commission
Thursday, July 19, 2018.

7//2018
Prepared and shared by the One Health Commission   

 


WHAT IS ProMED?
Tuesday, July 17, 2018.

WHAT IS ProMED? WHO READS ProMED?

SOME OF OUR SUCCESSES

ProMED SUBSCRIPTIONS

 

Internet-based reporting system for rapid, global

dissemination of information on infectious disease

outbreaks and acute exposures to toxins in humans,

animals, and plants

 

Free to everyone, open-access, and accessible via

email, website, Twitter, Facebook, or app

 

One of the early innovators using non-traditional &

informal information sources

 

Apolitical, transparent, committed to One Health

 

Publishes infectious disease reports on a real-time

basis around the clock

 

A program of the International Society for Infectious

Diseases (ISID)


The Early Warning Early Action (EWEA) report on food security BY FAO
Monday, July 16, 2018.

The July-September 2018 bulletin can be downloaded from: http://www.fao.org/3/CA0353EN/ca0353en.pdf

 

The Early Warning Early Action (EWEA) report on food security

and agriculture is developed by the Food and Agriculture

Organization of the United Nations (FAO). It provides a quarterly

forward-looking analysis of major disaster risks to food security and

agriculture, specifically highlighting:

potential new emergencies resulting from imminent disaster

threats

new developments in countries already affected by protracted

crises which are likely to cause a further deterioration of food

insecurity


Penn ONE HEALTH goes abroad
Penn (USA): Office of University Communications
Wednesday, July 11, 2018.

Penn One Health goes abroad

Ferrara found he could combine his love for animals with a public-health perspective through One Health, which analyzes and addresses health ...

"...Ferrara found he could combine his love for animals with a public-health perspective through One Health [also see www.onehealthinitiative.com], which analyzes and addresses health issues at the intersections of human, animal, and environmental health. ... “The One Health perspective is inherently interdisciplinary,” ... He says he also hopes his trip to Nepal will serve as a model for future projects and sees no bounds for One Health’s potential at Penn. Eventually, Ferrara wants to establish a One Health Center on campus where students and researchers can foster ideas and develop intervention projects.” ...  “It’s really about the One Health perspective,” he says. “Maybe we have our separate expertise, but One Health is a vehicle to bring people together to tackle more complex, interdisciplinary issues.” ...”



Sitting Down With… [Dr.] Richard M. Linnehan, Veterinarian/Astronaut, Houston, USA - The Pathologist, June 2018 ["...how important the concept of ONE HEALTH is..."
The Pathologist
Sunday, July 08, 2018.

https://thepathologist.com/fileadmin/_processed_/0/a/csm_TP_Issue_0618cover_8d5c769654.png

 

About this Article, Published in Issue #0618 SEE:  https://thepathologist.com/issues/0618/the-astropathologist/

The Pathologist’s June issue covers what we gain from death! We speak to a team of experts behind human decomposition facilities to dig into how the dead can breathe life into research and provide vital forensic clues. We also delve into measuring the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, detecting malaria in mosquitoes with NIRS, how AI can aid healthcare, using methylation biomarkers to assist prognosis, the lab of the future, and much more. Plus, we sit down with astronaut and veterinary pathologist Richard M. Linnehan to discuss his career on and off the planet.

Sitting Down With… [Dr.] Richard M. Linnehan, Veterinarian/Astronaut, Houston, USA

“... When you look down at our planet from space, you realize that everything that seems so big and infinite… isn’t. It made me realize just how important the concept of “One Health” is. For instance, I’m a veterinarian, so I do comparative pathology – avian, reptile, amphibian, mammalian, human, even invertebrate – but most healthcare professionals focus only on humans. “One Health” brings us back to the idea that it’s all connected. Disease entities don’t stick to a single organism or environment; they move between them. The planet is smaller than we think. It’s a closed ecosystem, and everything that lives will eventually, in some way, affect everything else. ...”

June 2018

 

What initially prompted you to study veterinary pathology?

I was always interested in disease processes and epidemiology, but what sparked my interest in veterinary medicine was working for a local equine and large animal veterinarian in high school. I thought it was really cool that a human could actually help animals that big. I was interested in human medicine, too, but I was so intrigued by the veterinary side – especially exotic animals – that I decided to take that route.

I did my veterinary residency in comparative pathology and exotic animal medicine, and then did research and clinical work with zoo animals for several years. My main interest, even then, was in marine mammals and related ecosystems. I met the head of the US Navy’s marine mammal program while in veterinary school, and I wanted to be the program’s main veterinarian. Even though I had stayed in touch and geared my residency and extracurricular activities toward marine mammal work, I couldn’t believe it when I got the job!

The program involved training teams of sea lions and dolphins to perform underwater searches – they were much better than human divers. The animals were never in danger, of course; we just relied on them to detect and report potential hazards. In fact, they were better taken care of medically and nutritionally than most people! We also did some pretty cool research – studies on reproduction, longevity, nutrition, and many other things.

How did that lead to a career as an astronaut?

Before I applied to veterinary school, the only other thing I had ever wanted to be was a fighter pilot. I was accepted into the Air Force and veterinary school at the same time, and my advisor convinced me to choose the latter. During my studies, I used to watch the shuttle launches and ask myself, “How can I still fly?” And I figured that, if the space program was sending up mission specialists, doctors, physicists, and geologists, they’d need a veterinarian as well.

I interviewed with them (for which I can thank my experience as a deploying military marine mammal veterinarian) and, in 1992, they called me to say, “Would you like to be an astronaut?” Well – of course I would!

When you look down at our planet from space, you realize that everything that seems so big and infinite… isn’t. It made me realize just how important the concept of “One Health” is. For instance, I’m a veterinarian, so I do comparative pathology – avian, reptile, amphibian, mammalian, human, even invertebrate – but most healthcare professionals focus only on humans. “One Health” brings us back to the idea that it’s all connected. Disease entities don’t stick to a single organism or environment; they move between them. The planet is smaller than we think. It’s a closed ecosystem, and everything that lives will eventually, in some way, affect everything else.

What was your role on your missions?

My first mission, STS-78, was a life and microgravity sciences mission in the Spacelab where we looked at how various biological processes work in space. We looked at the differences in how biological systems function in zero or microgravity versus normal gravity. Everything that has ever lived on Earth has evolved in a 1 G gravity field, so when you take that away, how do things respond?

The second flight – STS-90, or Neurolab – was much more involved. We were looking at nervous system disturbances brought on by spaceflight. We had a vast array of animals – crickets, rodents, even oyster toadfish. Fish are kind of wild because their neutral buoyancy means that they live in a pseudo-microgravity environment – but they rely on gravity to tell them up from down. So how do they maintain buoyancy and navigation in space?

We also liked to joke that we had four big primates on board on whom we performed most of our experiments – us. I was pleased to have the opportunity to use my veterinary degree and pathology training to help the future survival of humanity. If we can’t figure out how to keep humans healthy and strong in space, then we’re not going to go. We won’t travel long distances to other planets, because by the time we get there, we’re going to be so unhealthy and so discombobulated that we won’t be able to function. I hope our operational studies will one day help humans take to the stars.

My final two missions were not life sciences-related, and allowed me to venture into the world of spacewalking. On STS-109, we rendezvoused with, repaired, and upgraded the Hubble Space Telescope. That was an awesome flight experience and a great mission. My last flight, STS-123, was to the International Space Station, where I and my spacewalk team helped build the space station. We installed the Japanese laboratory, called Kibo, and a giant robot called the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator that moves around the station and replaces worn-out parts.

What do you think is the most underrepresented aspect of pathology?

I think it’s comparative pathology – the link between disease processes in humans, animals, and the environment. We haven’t thought about it as much as we should because we’re too focused on our own species, so we don’t always consider that the same organisms and errors cause problems to other species as well, even though the presentations may be different to our own. We must remember that it’s all interrelated.

Permission to reprint granted to the One Health Initiative website July 8, 2018 by:

Michael Schubert, Editor | Texere Publishing Limited, t: 01565 745 193 | www.thepathologist.com


 
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