One Health Publications

June 14, 2009

Centre for Public Health, Zoonoses Launched at University of Guelph’s Ontario Veterinary College May 04, 2009 - News Release http://www.uoguelph.ca/news/2009/05/centre_for_publ.html   As stated in the News Release (please see entire notice in link above) and repeated in full on this One Health Initiative’s website Publication page HTM View…A one-of-a-kind centre aimed at preventing and controlling emerging animal-related diseases that threaten public health has officially opened at the University of Guelph. The Centre for Public Health and Zoonoses brings together scientists in a variety of fields to address new or re-emerging zoonotic diseases (those that can jump between animals and humans) such as the H1N1 flu virus, bird flu, E. coli 0157:H7 and West Nile virus… Please see Centre For Public Health & Zoonoses  website for further information. University of GuelphGuelph, ON N1G 2W1 http://www.ovc.uoguelph.ca/cphaz/

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One-health wonders column featuring Thomas P. Monath, MD

June 5, 2009

One-health wonders – Thomas P. Monath, MD   Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association NEWS - June 15, 2009   JAVMA NEWS:  http://www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/jun09/090615u.asp   One-health wonders column featuring Thomas P. Monath, MD

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MU builds ties between veterinary and human researchers

June 3, 2009

Orthopedic Surgeons (a veterinarian and physician) Research Creative Hip and Knee Replacements for Dogs and Humans Together - Wednesday, June 03, 2009 One Health in ACTION!  Orthopedic Surgeons (a veterinarian and physician) Research Creative Hip and Knee Replacements for Dogs and Humans Together “Jimi Cook [DVM, PhD] and I have worked alongside a team of specialists from medicine, veterinary medicine, and engineering for seven years now. Our current focus is to develop replacement joints that mimic the natural process of cartilage and bone formation as they grow and develop. This kind of collaboration is essential to the creation of better options for the replacement of failing hips and other joints. By working with specialists in the veterinary field, we are able to evaluate our technology more rapidly, and that means that we will be able to develop these alternatives for humans sooner than if we worked alone.”   Sonny Bal [MD, JD, MBA] Veterinarian James Jimi Cook, DVM, PhD, a University of Missouri- Columbia college of veterinary medicine professor of orthopedic surgery and physician B. Sonny Bal, MD, JD, MBA, Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery college of medicine have collaborated for over seven years on efforts to create hip and knee replacements without using commonplace biomechanical metal and plastic materials.  The technique being developed by Dr. Cook for dogs initially, involves use of laboratory grown tissue (cartilage) that can be molded into replicas of joints that require replacement.  Drs. Bal and Cook are concomitantly developing a process whereby a similar process can be adapted for humans.   The two One Health supporters were recognized for their important biomedical research in the MISSOURIAN Newspaper, Tuesday, June 2, 2009.  This is another significant example of why “One Health” needs to be implemented into the scheme of health and health care as a paradigm shift.  Humans and animals will obviously benefit immensely in fields of biomedical research and public health. * http://www.columbiamissourian.com/stories/2009/06/02/mu-research-may-lead-treatment-lou-gehrigs-disease/  MU builds ties between veterinary and human researchers Tuesday, June 2, 2009 | 12:01 a.m. CDT (Permission to publish granted June 3, 2009)   *Please visit website link above to see accompanying Photo of Drs. Cook and Bal along with descriptive caption. You may also view the complete article with photo and caption by clicking the HTM View Box.   BY Tim Lloyd COLUMBIA — Jimi Cook’s grandfather was one of the first patients in the U.S. to have artificial knee replacement surgery.  “From the time I was 8 years old, I have always wanted to find a better way to treat arthritis after watching him go through six knee replacements,” Cook said. He is an associate professor of small animal surgery and director of the Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory at the MU School of Veterinary Medicine.  Nearly three decades after his grandfathers surgeries, Cook is developing new technology that might make repeat surgeries things of the past. But his discovery didn’t only come from studying the human skeletal system. “Dogs are the closest replicas of humans for us when it comes to studying clinical problems in knees and hips,” he said. Cooks new technique involves growing cartilage in a lab that can be molded into permanent joint replacements. It’s just one in a growing number of human medical advancements made by researchers studying their canine companions. Growing knees, hips and shoulders In the sterile petri dishes of a walk-in-closet sized lab, cells divide and multiply into living cartilage that Cook plans to mold into new knees and hips for dogs.     “The goal is to make replacement parts,” said Sonny Bal, an associate professor of orthopedic surgery at the MU School of Medicine. Bal is working with Cook on the human application of his technique.   The collaboration between Cook and Bal is welcome news to Bob Reeves, a retired Columbia resident who in the last four years has had both of his knees replaced with metal transplants. The surgeries are the most recent in a series of medical procedures that are likely the result of injuries he suffered in a construction accident almost 50 years ago, Reeves said.   “I was working to pay my way through college when a scaffold broke and I fell 35 feet,” Reeves said. “I’m sort of like The Six Million Dollar Man, but my wife says I’m more like $49.95.” Reeves said that even though he has worked hard to regain strength and motion in his body, the metal replacement parts have limited the improvements. “My body has healed around the metal parts, but metal won’t improve with the rest of my body,” Reeves said.  Cook’s technique replaces damaged joints with living tissue, meaning patients like Reeves could get a new set of knees that would heal with the rest of their bodies.  “That would be extremely helpful for people who need transplants,” said Robert Kimble, a 78-year-old who has had three knee transplants in the last eight years. “That would be a heck of an improvement.” The technique being developed by Cook mimics the natural process of cartilage and bone formation during growth and development of the joints. Molds of joints are then made and filled with lab-grown cartilage, forming exact replicas of joints in need of replacement.   Because conditions like arthritis progress month to years faster in dogs, Cook is able to more rapidly test the effectiveness of his technique.   “In dogs with arthritis, everything happens much faster,” Cook said. “This allows us to see the results of our research sooner than if we were working on humans.” The Food and Drug Administration recognizes physical similarities between dogs and humans, and if a new treatment is proved effective for dogs, it can more quickly be tested in humans.  “We’ve been working on this for seven years,” Cook said. “It would have taken 15 to 20 years if we were working on humans.” This summer, Cook will begin testing his technology on dogs in need of new hip joints. If effective, the tests will continue into long-term studies. Human testing is the final phase. New horizons Cook and Bal are widening the scope of previous collaborations to include engineers from the Missouri University of Science and Technology and researchers at Columbia University in New York City. The multidisciplinary approach puts MU in line with a worldwide effort to strengthen ties between veterinary medical and human medical research, said Bruce Kaplan, a Florida veterinarian and co-founder of the Web site Onehealthinitiative.com. The site promotes the One Health movement, which advocates collaboration between veterinary and human research. The concept has received endorsements from the American Medical Association and the American Veterinary Medical Association. “The campuses that have veterinarians and physicians working together are where a good deal of biomedical research is done,” Kaplan said. “Dr. Cook has become a giant in the field.” Recently discovered neurological similarities between dogs and humans could lead to treatments for degenerative brain diseases. Veterinary neurologist Joan Coates is part of a research team that found a genetic link between hereditary degenerative myelopathy (DM) in dogs and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig’s Disease. “There is a potential that this discovery may assist with finding new treatments that will slow the progress of some forms of hereditary ALS,” Coates said.  She is quick to point out that years of study are needed before a treatment for humans can be developed. “We still have a lot of work to develop markers of disease in dogs in order to evaluate disease progression and response to potential treatments,” Coates said. Working with dogs could shorten the time frame. “ALS takes two to five years to progress in humans; it takes six months to a year in dogs,” Coates said. “We may be able to test and see more results more quickly when evaluating potential therapies in dogs.” Kaplan said Cook and Coates advances could just be the beginning of new advances in the field of veterinary and human medicine.  “If you combine the brains and minds of different medicines, you will come up with things that would have not come about otherwise,” Kaplan said. “It could be miraculous.” 

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One Health Newsletter Editor Honored at Florida Veterinary Medical Association (FVMA) Annual Meeting, April 17, 2009

May 29, 2009

  One Health Newsletter Editor Honored at Florida Veterinary Medical Association (FVMA) Annual Meeting, April 17, 2009   Mary Echols, DVM, MPH awarded FVMA Gold Star Award   By Amber Smith FVMA Director of Communications and Public Relations   Dr. Mary Echols is the epitome of the “gentle doctor.’’ Her colleagues describe her as humble, hard working, visionary and extremely effective.   Dr. Echols, an Environmental Consultant with the Palm Beach County Health Department, was nominated for the Florida Veterinary Medical Association’s 2009 Gold Star Award by Dr. Lisa Conti, Director of the Florida Department of Health’s Division of Environmental Health. The award is given to a veterinarian who has contributed much of his or her time and energy to the FVMA and/or a local veterinary association as well as promoting the advancement of veterinary medicine and the profession. The recipient must also be a member in good standing of the FVMA. In addition to her work for the Palm Beach County Health Department, Dr. Echols is also the editor of the ONE HEALTH newsletter published by the Florida Department of Health.   She brought together the resources and cooperation of the FVMA, the state Department of Health and the veterinary community in general, to launch the state’s ONE HEALTH initiative.   “Dr. Echols is the driving force behind the ONE HEALTH initiative,’’ said Dr. Conti. “She began the ONE HEALTH newsletter to reach a wide audience of veterinarians, human health workers and public health professionals to collaborate on protecting and promoting the health of all species.’’   Dr. Echols has successfully published four quarterly issues of the newsletter and has received national recognition for her efforts as well as accolades for the high-quality publication.   “We are very proud to have Dr. Mary Echols representing the FVMA so favorably,’’ said Dr. Conti.   FVMA Executive Director Philip J. Hinkle said it was an easy decision for the FVMA awards committee to make in selecting Dr. Echols as a Gold Star Award recipient.   “Dr. Echols truly represents all the criteria of the Gold Star Award. She has done an excellent job in promoting veterinary medicine and is an outstanding example of the profession,’’ Hinkle said.   Provided May 29, 2009 courtesy of: Amber L. Smith Director of Communications and Public Relations Florida Veterinary Medical Association 7131 Lake Ellenor Dr. Orlando, FL  32809 Toll-free: 800-992-3862 Fax: 407-240-3710 E-mail: asmith@fvma.com

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An Overview of Safety and Health for Workers in the Horse-Racing Industry

May 19, 2009

An Overview of Safety and Health for Workers in the Horse-Racing Industry NIOSH Publication No. 2009-128: April, 2009   http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2009-128/      This document addresses some of the health and safety issues faced by workers in the horse racing industry. It is a good example of “One Health” in practice - the document was co-written by a veterinarian, a physician, and safety specialists on staff at NIOSH, with input from other professionals around the country, and addresses an issue important to both human and animal health.   Provided May 19, 2009 by:   John D. Gibbins, DVM, MPH, dipl. ACVPM  Commander US Public Health Service Senior Staff Veterinary Epidemiologist  Hazard Evaluations and Technical Assistance Branch CDC/NIOSH 4676 Columbia Parkway R-10 Cincinnati Ohio 45226

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An Important Newsweek Letter-to-the Editor from: Laura H. Kahn, MD

May 19, 2009

  An Important Newsweek Letter-to-the Editor from:    Laura H. Kahn, MD – May 16, 2009  (Scroll down to third letter)   From the magazine issue dated May 25, 2009   ‘Fear & the Flu: The New Age of Pandemics’   http://www.newsweek.com/id/197887?tid=relatedcl   In response to the following:   The Path of a Pandemic How one virus spread from pigs and birds to humans around the globe. And why microbes like the H1N1 flu have become a growing threat. By Laurie Garrett | NEWSWEEK Published May 2, 2009 From the magazine issue dated May 18, 2009   http://www.newsweek.com/id/195692   Newsweek permission to publish granted: Tuesday, May 19, 2009 1:15 PM

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The American Physiological Society Endorses One Health – May 11, 2009

May 11, 2009

The American Physiological Society has endorsed the One Health Initiative.  Please see published letter from President, Dr. Irving H. Zucker and Executive Director, Dr. Martin Frank on this Publication page and the News page of this website.

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Compendium of Measures to Prevent Disease Associated with Animals in Public Settings, 2009

May 8, 2009

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5805a1.htm   Compendium of Measures to Prevent Disease Associated with Animals in Public Settings, 2009 National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, Inc. (NASPHV) Prepared by NASPHV This report has been endorsed by CDC, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and the American Veterinary Medical Association.

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One-health wonders – Bruce Kaplan, DVM

May 5, 2009

JAVMA NEWS: http://www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/may09/090515w.asp   One-health wonders column featuring Bruce Kaplan, DVM

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The global impact of hand hygiene campaigning

May 4, 2009

http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=19191   Eurosurveillance, Volume 14, Issue 17, 30 April 2009 Editorials The global impact of hand hygiene campaigning C Kilpatrick (kilpatrickc@who.int)1, B Allegranzi1, D Pittet1,2 World Health Organization (WHO) Patient Safety, WHO Headquarters, Geneva, Switzerland Infection Control Programme, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland

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Sebelius, Napolitano to Host Webcast on H1N1 Flu, Answers Questions from the American People

May 4, 2009

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/webcast.htm   Sebelius, Napolitano to Host Webcast on H1N1 Flu, Answers Questions from the American People

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Flu outbreak: Theres more than one doctor in the house

May 4, 2009

http://www.avma.org/press/releases/090504_H1N1_flu.asp

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Swine Influenza – May 1, 2009, Vol. 84, 18 (pp 149-160)

May 2, 2009

http://www.who.int/wer/2009/wer8418.pdf Swine Influenza Outbreak News

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Outbreak of Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection – Mexico, March – April, 2009

May 2, 2009

http://www.who.int/wer/2009/wer8418.pdf Outbreak of Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection - Mexico, March - April, 2009

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Dr. Michael D. Cates Takes Leadership Role on AVMAs One Health Joint Steering Committee

April 30, 2009

http://news.prnewswire.com/DisplayReleaseContent.aspx?ACCT=ind_focus.story&STORY=/www/story/04-24-2009/0005012663&EDATE=

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2009 H1N1 Flu Virus Outbreak -Public Health Update

April 30, 2009

http://www.avma.org/public_health/influenza/new_virus/default.asp

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Obituaries – Janis H. Audin (1950-2009)

April 30, 2009

http://www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/may09/090515ff.asp

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Dr Janis Audin (1951-2009)

April 29, 2009

Dr Janis Audin (1951-2009)   Dr. Audin’s obituary can be accessed at the following link:   http://www.cababstractsplus.org/veterinarymedicine/articles.asp?ArticleID=19439&action=display&openMenu=relatedItems&Year=2009   This link is to the current VetMed Resource site. You may need to log in. Please feel free to use this free username and password that will be good till the end of May.   Username: CAB5 Password: copenhagen (please note that the username and password are case sensitive and should be entered as typed).   Link and permission to access provided by:   Robert Taylor Content Manager, Animal, Human & Social Sciences CABI Head Office Nosworthy Way Wallingford Oxfordshire OX10 8DE United Kingdom

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Swine Influenza (Flu)

April 29, 2009

Swine Influenza CDC Update - April 29, 2009 http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/?s_cid=swineFlu_outbreak_001

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