One Health Publications

Swine Influenza (Flu)

April 28, 2009

http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - April 28, 2009 Swine Influenza (Flu)

View Publication

Influenza-like illness in the United States and Mexico – April 24, 2009

April 25, 2009

Influenza-like illness in the United States and Mexico 24 April 2009 -- http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_04_24/en/index.html

View Publication

Update: Swine Influenza A (H1N1) Infection – California and Texas

April 25, 2009

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm58d0424a1.htm Update: Swine Influenza A (H1N1) Infection - California and Texas

View Publication

Integrated control of neglected zoonotic diseases in Africa

April 25, 2009

http://www.who.int/wer/2009/wer8417.pdf Integrated control of neglected zoonotic diseases in Africa WHO - Weekly Epidemiological Record 24 April 2009, vol. 84, 17 (pp. 147-148)

View Publication

One Health One Medicine Foundation website

April 24, 2009

One Health One Medicine Foundation   http://www.onehealthonemedicine.org/   “The One Health, One Medicine Clinics were initiated in 2007 by St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine student Brittany King on the island of Grenada, West Indies.”

View Publication

Editor-in-Chief Emeritus Audin Dies – Janis H. Audin, MS, DVM

April 23, 2009

http://www.avma.org/aa/audin_janis_090423.asp Dr. Janis H. Audin, JAVMA Editor-in-Chief Emeritus Dies April 22, 2009. Please see Tribute to Dr. Audin on News page of this website.

View Publication

American Association of Wildlife Veterinarians NEWSLETTER – WINTER 2009

April 17, 2009

American Association of Wildlife Veterinarians NEWSLETTER - WINTER 2009 ONE HEALTH ISSUE...  

View Publication

Surprising diversity found in H5N1 in Asian chickens

April 15, 2009

Surprising diversity found in H5N1 in Asian chickens April 14, 2009 CIDRAP News Center for Infectious Disease Research & Policy Academic Health Center -- University of Minnesota Copyright © 2009 Regents of the University of Minnesota   http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/avianflu/news/apr1409vietnam.html

View Publication

National Wildlife Disease Surveillance and Emergency Response Program

April 15, 2009

National Wildlife Disease Surveillance and Emergency Response Program   THE CARRIER -  Volume 1, Issue 2   See a significant One Health comment by Coordinator, Dr. Thomas DeLiberto in the first article.   http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wildlife_damage/nwdp/pdf/TheCarrier1(2).pdf   Provided by: Michael P. MillesonWildlife Disease BiologistUSDA/APHIS/WS-FloridaNational Wildlife Disease SurveillanceAnd Emergency Response Program2820 East University AvenueGainesville, FL  32641

View Publication

April 13, 2009

April 13, 2009   One Health Newsletter – 2009 Spring Issue Published   One Health Newsletter   ONE HEALTH NEWSLETTER – 2009 Spring Issue Published   http://www.doh.state.fl.us/Environment/medicine/One_Health/OHNLSpring2009.pdf

View Publication

Immuno Valley Consortium and One Health

April 10, 2009

Immuno Valley Consortium and One Health www.immunovalley.nl Research and valorisation in emerging infectious diseases Immuno Valley strives to connect animal and human health Mission Immuno Valley 2007-2010 Immuno Valley brings science into society. It strives to reinforce economic activity in the field of health and life sciences. Provided April 10, 2009 by: Prof Arno N. Vermeulen, PhD Immuno Valley General Management & Valorisation PO Box 80163 Yalelaan 1 3508 TD Utrecht, Netherlands

View Publication

Request for Abstract Reviewers for the 2009 National Environmental Health Conference

April 10, 2009

Request for Abstract Reviewers for the 2009 National Environmental Health Conference Your help is needed to identify abstract reviewers for the 2009 National Environmental Public Health Conference, Healthy People in a Healthy Environment, in Atlanta, Georgia,  October 26-28, 2009. Please send in completed forms to nephc2009@cdc.gov. by April 17th.  If selected, reviewers will be notified by the end of April.  See blank PDF form attached.   Reviewers are needed for each of the six conference tracks, please see the list below.  Each reviewer may be asked to review up to 20 abstracts. Abstract review will occur May 11-29, 2009.    Conference Tracks:  Healthy Places Public Health & Environmental Exposures Sustainability & Public Health Environmental Systems & Public Health Environmental Health Emergencies Environmental Health Science & Practice  Provided by: Lisa Conti, DVM, MPH, Dipl. ACVPM, CEHP Director, Division of Environmental Health Florida State Health Department Tallahassee, FL

View Publication

Rockefeller Foundation funding creation of One Health Commission

April 8, 2009

Rockefeller Foundation funding creation of One Health Commission   JAVMA News – April 15, 2009  http://www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/apr09/090415h.asp      

View Publication

April 6, 2009

An opinion…   Prepared for the One Health Initiative website April 5, 2009   Neglected “Other” One Health Heroes!   Bruce Kaplan, DVM   The International One Health movement generally puts focus on the crucial public health aspects of this life protecting-life saving concept.  The physicians, veterinarians and other health scientists/professionals associated with zoonotic disease prevention and control are indeed essential for our global health.   These professionals are important in solving many of the riddles associated with biosecurity and threats of bioterrorism too.   However, One Health also encompasses cancer research, cardiovascular diseases, obesity, orthopedic prosthetic device advances, vaccine development, environmental health, plant health etc.  Without including these health and health care concerns … “One Health” becomes “Some Health”.   In the 1970s and early 1980s the 20th century public health community recognized and promoted this concept (under the heading of ‘One Medicine’) without any participation by or recognition of their counterpart clinical-colleagues that are equally important.  Private practitioners of human and veterinary medicine continue to be largely unaware of One Health and not participatory to any noticeable extent. They have therefore not expressed their powerful voice on the issue.  The knowledgeable clinical health/academic communities of veterinary medicine and medicine have not, to date, acknowledged that many of their visionary “other” colleagues are a crucial part of the One Health big picture. Limited input has evolved from environmental health and plant health experts. Most are unaware of and/or do not grasp the significance of including plant health.   To name a small number (there are more throughout the world!) of these unheralded “other” One Health heroes in the U.S.:   Jedd Wolchok, MD, PhD Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center 1275 York Ave (Z-1462) New York, NY 10021 wolchokj@mskcc.org   Philip J. Bergman, DVM, MS, PhD Diplomate ACVIM, Oncology Chief Medical Officer BrightHeart Veterinary Centers 80 Business Park Drive, Suite 110 Armonk, NY  10504 (USA) pbergman@brightheartvet.com   Robert D. Cardiff, MD, PhD Center for Comparative Medicine University of California, Davis County Road 98 and Hutchison Drive Davis CA 95616 (USA) rdcardiff@ucdavis.edu   Doug Thamm, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM (Oncology) Colorado State University Assistant Professor College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Department of Clinical Sciences Fort Collins, CO 80523   Steven Dow, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM Colorado State University Associate Professor College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Department of Pathology Fort Collins, CO 80523 Steven.Dow@ColoState.edu   James (Jimi) L. Cook, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVS William C. Allen Endowed Scholar for Orthopaedic Research Director, Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory University of Missouri 900 East Campus Drive Columbia, MO 65211 cookjl@missouri.edu    Thomas P. Monath, MD, Partner Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers Pandemic & Biodefense Fund 21 Finn Road Harvard MA 01451 tmonath@kpcb.com   Lisa Conti, DVM, MPH, Dipl. ACVPM, CEHP Director, Division of Environmental Health Florida State Health Department Tallahassee, FL (USA) Lisa_Conti@doh.state.fl.us   David R. Franz, DVM, PhD V.P. & Chief Biological Scientist Midwest Research Institute Director, NABC Kansas State University 365 W. Patrick Street, Suite 223 Frederick, MD  21701 dfranz@mriresearch.org   Jacqueline Fletcher, PhD Sarkeys Distinguished Professor Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology Oklahoma State University Stillwater, OK 74078 Jacqueline.fletcher@okstate.edu   Submissions of One Health opinions (letters of commentary) for publication consideration are encouraged and welcomed.

View Publication

Disease Specific Recommendations

April 4, 2009

March 24, 2009 / Vol. 58 CDC’s MMWR  Pertinent Zoonotic Disease Information: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/rr/rr58e324.pdf  Disease Specific Recommendations.

View Publication

Gastritis caused by Helicobacter heilmannii probably transmitted from dog to child.

March 25, 2009

1: Arch Pediatr. 2009 Mar 18. [Epub ahead of print] Links [Gastritis caused by Helicobacter heilmannii probably transmitted from dog to child.] [Article in French] Duquenoy A, Le Luyer B.   http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6VKK-4VW4V6S-1&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=30cdac4b628a92bb413aa4f05d5d56dc Département de pédiatrie, groupe hospitalier du Havre, 55, Bis rue Gustave-Flaubert, 76083 Le Havre cedex, France. Gastric infection with Helicobacter heilmannii is rare but is known to be associated with chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer, and low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in humans. In contrast to H. pylori, various H. heilmannii species colonize the stomachs of domestic animals, which might be a reservoir for transmission to humans. We report the case of a 12-year-old boy presenting with chronic gastritis caused by H. heilmannii. Endoscopic examination reveals H. heilmannii-like infection on biopsy samples in his two pet dogs. Sequencing of the 16S and 23S ribosomal DNA by PCR was used to compare the H. heilmannii-like bacterial samples isolated in the boy and his dogs. These DNA amplification methods suggest that the boy was infected by his pet dogs (zoonosis). Our patient was cured by treatment with proton-pump inhibitor and antibiotics. Endoscopic follow-up of the boy showed a complete cure of gastritis and eradication of the bacterium. PMID: 19303265 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] Related Articles ·         Specific detection and prevalence of Helicobacter heilmannii-like organisms in the human gastric mucosa by fluorescent in situ hybridization and partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing. [J Clin Microbiol. 2001] ·         Helicobacter heilmannii-associated primary gastric low-grade MALT lymphoma: complete remission after curing the infection. [Gastroenterology. 2000] ·         Helicobacter heilmannii gastritis: association with acid peptic diseases and comparison with Helicobacter pylori gastritis. [Mod Pathol. 1999] ·         ReviewHelicobacter heilmannii gastritis: a case study with review of literature. [Am J Surg Pathol. 2005] ·         ReviewHelicobacter heilmannii infection in a child after successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori: case report and review of literature. [J Gastroenterol. 2005] » See All...

View Publication

Nonfatal Fall-Related Injuries Associated with Dogs and Cats — United States, 2001–2006

March 25, 2009

MMWR   March 27, 2009 / 58(11);277-281  Nonfatal Fall-Related Injuries Associated with Dogs and Cats --- United States, 2001--2006 http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5811a1.htm?s_cid=mm5811a1_e 

View Publication

Veterinary Epidemiological Bulletin Sri Lanka

March 23, 2009

Veterinary Epidemiological Bulletin Sri Lanka Ravi Bandara Dissanayake, BVSc, Editor

View Publication

Chapter 8 zoonoses in wildlife integrating ecology into management.

March 21, 2009

  : Adv Parasitol. 2009;68:185-209. Chapter 8 zoonoses in wildlife integrating ecology into management. Mathews F. Zoonoses in wildlife not only play an important ecological role, but pose significant threats to the health of humans, domestic animals and some endangered species. More than two-thirds of emerging, or re-emerging, infectious diseases are thought to originate in wildlife. Despite this, co-ordinated surveillance schemes are rare, and most efforts at disease control operate at the level of crisis management. This review examines the pathways linking zoonoses in wildlife with infection in other hosts, using examples from a range of key zoonoses, including European bat lyssaviruses and bovine tuberculosis. Ecologically based control, including the management of conditions leading to spill-overs into target host populations, is likely to be more effective and sustainable than simple reductions in wildlife populations alone. PMID: 19289195 [PubMed - in process] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19289195?ordinalpos=6&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

View Publication