One Health Publications

February 23, 2020

The One Health concept -- the health of humans is intimately linked with the health of animals ... Wiley Online Library From the Division of Renal Medicine, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology Karolinska Institutet, Campus Flemingsberg, Stockholm, Sweden   One health. Content List – This is an article from the symposium: “Bioinspirational medicine”. Innovation based on bioinspiration, that is biomi-... https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/joim.13015

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ONE HEALTH Organizations

February 22, 2020

One Health organizations   World Organisation for Animal Health EcoHealth Alliance Global Alliance for Rabies Control World Veterinary Association World Medical Association Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute International Society for Infectious Diseases Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University    

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An Urgent Call to Make One Health Work for People and Our Planet

February 21, 2020

An Urgent Call to Make One Health Work for People and Our Planet MEDICC Review January 2020 begins a new decade, a chance for the international health community to take a hard look at where we are, where we stand, what we ...

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Trending Topics of One Health and Suicide Prevention Kickoff FREE Training for Veterinary Community

February 19, 2020

  Trending Topics of One Health and Suicide Prevention Kickoff FREE Training for Veterinary ... openPR (press release) Austin, Texas February 18, 2020 - The important topics of One Health and Suicide Prevention are both included in a new initiative to provide training to ... SEE: https://www.openpr.com/news/1936603/trending-topics-of-one-health-and-suicide-prevention-kickoff  

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World Veterinary Association (WVA) and Health for Animals announce the 2020 World Veterinary Day theme: Environmental protection for improving animal and human health

February 17, 2020

The World Veterinary Association (WVA) and Health for Animals are proud to announce the 2020 World Veterinary Day theme: Environmental protection for improving animal and human health. For 20 years, World Veterinary Day has been an opportunity to celebrate the contributions of veterinarians to the health of animals and society. As One Health advocates, veterinarians know that environmental, human and animal health are inextricably linked. Negative changes to our environment will ultimately harm ourselves and the animals in our care. The 2020 World Veterinary Day will be held on 25th April 2020 and is an opportunity to celebrate the work of veterinarians to protect our environment. The deadline for applications submission is 25th May 2020.  All the necessary information, application form and instructions, can be found in the attached documents.    The WVA encourages its partners to collaborate with WVA member associations and veterinarians around the world to celebrate the WVD2020 and to take part in the World Veterinary Day Award 2020.  Provided by: Dr Zeev Noga Executive Director   World Veterinary Association (WVA) Avenue de Tervueren 12 B-1040 Brussels, Belgium Tel: +32 (0) 2 533 70 22 zeev_noga@worldvet.org  secretariat@worldvet.org http://www.worldvet.org

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One Health concept gains importance

February 16, 2020

 Kerala One Health concept gains importance SEE FULL ARTICLE AT: ttps://www.thehindu.com/news/national/kerala/one-health-concept-gains-importance/article30832842.ece    Expert says programme can reduce incidence of zoonotic threats The concept of ‘One Health’, which recognises that health of human beings is connected to health of animals and environment, is gaining importance as most of the contagious diseases affecting humans are zoonotic (animal to man origin) in nature. “The concept of One Health can be effectively implemented for reducing incidence of emerging zoonotic threats like COVID-19. One Health is the collaborative efforts of multiple disciplines working locally, nationally, and globally, to attain optimal health for people, animals and our environment, as defined by the One Health Initiative Task Force,” says Dr. B. Sunil, Professor, Veterinary Public Health & Head, meat plant, Kerala veterinary and animal sciences university. ...

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February 15, 2020

SCIENTIFIC REPORTS Article https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-59109-w Open Access Published: 12 February 2020 Trends and clinico-epidemiological features of human rabies cases in Bangladesh 2006–2018 Ghosh, S., Rana, M.S., Islam, M.K. et al. Trends and clinico-epidemiological features of human rabies cases in Bangladesh 2006–2018.  Sci Rep 10, 2410 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-59109-w   “Vaccinating dogs against rabies is an effective means of reducing human rabies. We subjected 1327 clinically diagnosed human rabies death and mass dog vaccination (MDV) data during 2006–2018 to quantify the impacts of MDV on human rabies incidence in Bangladesh and a subset of rabies death data (422) for clinico-epidemiological analysis. A positive and increasing trend of MDV (p = 0.01 and tau = 0.71) and a negative and declining trend (p < 0.001 and tau = −0.88) of human rabies cases (Correlation coefficient: −0.82) have been observed. Among 422 deaths, the majority (78%) of the victims sought treatment from traditional healers, and 12% received post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). The mean incubation period of rabies in cases with exposure sites on the head & neck (35 days) was shorter than the upper limb (mean = 64 days, p = 0.02) and lower limb (mean = 89 days, p < 0.01). MDV has been found to be effective for reducing human rabies cases in Bangladesh. Creating awareness among the animal bite victims to stop reliance on traditional healers rather seeking PEP, addressing the role of traditional healers through awareness education programme with respect to the treatment of dog bites, ensuring availability of PEP, and continuing to scale up MDV may help to prevent human rabies deaths.  Rabies is a zoonotic viral disease responsible for the death of approximately 59,000 people worldwide with more than 3.7 million disability-adjusted life years lost annually(1) ...”   “Conclusion  Our study showed that mass dog vaccination (MDV) is one of the most important components of controlling human rabies in Bangladesh. Also, these data clearly spelt out that most deaths had occurred as a result of consultation with the traditional healers instead of seeking post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) from the hospitals and also due to the incomplete treatment course. Poor health-seeking behaviour of the rabies victims indicates the necessity to improve such behaviour through advocacy, communication, and social mobilization. It is necessary to address the role of traditional healers through an awareness education programme with respect to the treatment of dog bites and rabies and discouraging animal bite victims from visiting them. Ensuring the affordability and availability of rabies PEP in all areas of Bangladesh, especially in local public hospitals, is also important. Proper vaccine delivery needs sufficient personnel training to ensure correct storage, reconstitution, and injection. Sharing local epidemiological knowledge of rabies in animals may assist clinicians in making the right choice in treating rabies with PEP. We recommend conducting a humane method of dog population management programme along with the promotion of dog ownership and the continuation of scaling up MDV throughout the country to eliminate dog-mediated human rabies in Bangladesh. In addition, establishing a laboratory for rabies diagnosis and introducing an active surveillance system is necessary to monitor and evaluate emerging patterns and trends of the disease in Bangladesh. Strengthening and encouraging multi-sectoral involvement through the One Health approach is necessary for the sustainability of the rabies elimination programme in Bangladesh.”

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Coronavirus: Why China Needs to Change its Animal Health Policies

February 13, 2020

Environment, Health, News, Society February 12, 2020 Coronavirus: Why China Needs to Change its Animal Health Policies by Richard Seifman - Board Member, United Nations Association-National Capital Area China’s troubles with the on-going coronavirus outbreak originate with its animal health policies and programs: They need to change and here is how. China is frightened and focused on the 2019 n-CoV virus, now called by the WHO “COVID-19” and by the Chinese “Novel Coronavirus Pneumonia” (NCP).  It has paralyzed China’s people, resulting in over 44,000 infected cases and more than 1,000 deaths and severely hurt its own and the global economy. Both with respect to human health and the economic and social costs, the numbers are likely to be staggering. All this began because China, and other countries to be sure, allow live wildlife to be sold as food in so-called “wet” markets, i.e. food markets where wildlife animals are sold in proximity to domestic meat and animals. ... ... What to do?  Simply put, pursue a One Health approach, one which leads to integrated human-animal-environmental health policies and actions. ... Please read complete article at https://impakter.com/coronavirus-why-china-needs-change-animal-health-policies/

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Slides from the International Student One Health Alliance (ISOHA) webinar on 9 Feb, 2020

February 12, 2020

Slides from the International Student One Health Alliance (ISOHA) webinar on 9 Feb, 2020 (provide by George Lueddeke, PhD, Med, Dipl. AVES (Hon.):   ISOHAs slides: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1bT5shev6e6pJlj6PrfN4kBSWSF8C6p4M/view?usp=sharing Dr. Lueddekes slides: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ULm4KYr1jYRih-JsWWlpNLanDBfLOGc0/view?usp=sharing Dr. Thomsons slides: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1kd45LFigeL238fXotCxqvkJ_T_UR-O2d/view?usp=sharing One Health and indigenous peoples of the Arctic:https://www.onehealthcommission.org/index.cfm/37526/97497/one_health_collaborations_in_us_state_and_local_governments__policy_webinars(See October 24th material) 1HOPE: https://www.onehealthcommission.org/en/programs/one_health_education_task_force/ Please send your questions, comments and feedback to: bca90@msstate.edu. For speaking inquiries, please contact Dr. George Lueddeke via glueddeke@aol.com.  See Dr. Lueddeke’s attached short Biography.

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Coronavirus: Hear From One Health Experts

February 11, 2020

 (USA)   Coronavirus: Hear From One Health Experts   By Dateline Staff on February 10, 2020 in University Updated Feb. 10: Watch UC Davis Live discussion on coronavirus, recorded Feb. 6 and featuring Tracey Goldstein and Christine Johnson, associate directors, UC Davis One Health Institute. SEE https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/coronavirus-travel-warning-other-cautions/

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Finding Outbreaks Faster: Metrics for One Health Surveillance

February 8, 2020

Finding Outbreaks Faster: Metrics for One Health Surveillance https://www.salzburgglobal.org/news/latest-news/article/finding-outbreaks-faster-metrics-for-one-health-surveillance.html

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DUKE (USA) ONE HEALTH Newsletter – Issue 23 February 2020

February 2, 2020

ISSUE 23 February 2020 SEE:  https://mailchi.mp/1be02835ba86/oh-newsletter-feb-issue

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January 31, 2020

“How urbanization and the way we deal with animals may influence the spread of illnesses like coronavirus” - Pathogens are less likely to ‘die out’ when humans and animals cluster in large groups, says epidemiologist ( CBC Radio · Posted: Jan 30, 2020 11:59 AM ET) https://www.cbc.ca/radio/costofliving/germs-gambling-and-globalization-from-the-coronavirus-to-brexit-1.5445128/how-urbanization-and-the-way-we-deal-with-animals-may-influence-the-spread-of-illnesses-like-coronavirus-1.5445716  

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Coronavirus Outbreak Could Impact Agriculture

January 30, 2020

Coronavirus Outbreak Could Impact Agriculture http://www.kmaland.com/ag/coronavirus-outbreak-could-impact-agriculture/article_de0a6e4a-41c2-11ea-9d26-c7e307a97fa4.html KMAland “But, we need to think of ways, frankly, to work with veterinarians, people in agricultural industries, to better anticipate these things in a one-health way.

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Chinas Coronavirus: How Do We Stop Such Deadly Threats?

January 28, 2020

Chinas Coronavirus: How Do We Stop Such Deadly Threats? SEE entire article at: https://www.usnews.com/news/best-countries/articles/2020-01-27/commentary-chinas-coronavirus-how-do-we-stop-such-deadly-threats U.S. News & World Report Often, the best that public health officials can hope for it to slow down ... Often, such an interdisciplinary collaboration is termed the One Health ... ... How do we fix this problem? Many scientific and policy experts now recognize that humans and animals are inextricably linked. Animals are a huge part of the worlds agricultural and food systems. However, despite the benefits of modern farm biosecurity measures, when a virus finds its way into a large farm, the virus may easily be sustained in the farm, passing from one generation of animals to the next. The continuous viral reproduction can sometimes lead to mutations or the mixing of viruses and a never-before-seen virus may emerge. Hence, new collaborative partnerships must be forged between agricultural businesses and human, animal and environmental health groups so that emerging viruses can be better be detected and mitigation strategies developed before a novel virus crosses over to infect man. Often, such an interdisciplinary collaboration is termed the One Health Approach. Many institutions are calling for One Health interdisciplinary collaborations as the best approach to complex problems such as emerging viral threats. While there is much discussion about engaging in such collaborations, there is also much resistance from the agricultural industries as those businesses fear a negative impact on their commerce. It may eventually take legislation and policy to make One Health collaborations routine. Contributor: Gregory C. Gray, MD, MPH https://www.usnews.com/topics/author/gregory-c-gray.  Dr. Gray is a member of the One Health Initiative teams Advisory Board (Hon.) http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/advBoard.php

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THE TRUMPET – Project Save the World Occasional Newsletter

January 25, 2020

JANUARY 2020 VOL. 1, NO. 1 THE TRUMPET Project Save the World’s Occasional Newsletter “Promote One Health Initiatives! Animals and people can exchange diseases, and also be affected by the environmental changes, including global warming. Now health researchers are working together to solve these joint problems.” SEE: Laura H. Kahn, MD, MPH, MPP https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfYAILlIu0c

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Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Transmission

January 21, 2020

U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal (EID) Volume 26, Number 2—February 2020 Perspective Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Transmission Abstract Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection causes a spectrum of respiratory illness, from asymptomatic to mild to fatal. MERS-CoV is transmitted sporadically from dromedary camels to humans and occasionally through human-to-human contact. Current epidemiologic evidence supports a major role in transmission for direct contact with live camels or humans with symptomatic MERS, but little evidence suggests the possibility of transmission from camel products or asymptomatic MERS cases. Because a proportion of case-patients do not report direct contact with camels or with persons who have symptomatic MERS, further research is needed to conclusively determine additional mechanisms of transmission, to inform public health practice, and to refine current precautionary recommendations.

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Farm project hopes to create a learning and treatment retreat by teaming up with AmeriCorps

January 16, 2020

Farm project hopes to create a learning and treatment retreat by teaming up with AmeriCorps Top Stories by: Larmie Sanyon Posted: Jan 15, 2020 / 07:12 PM EST / Updated: Jan 15, 2020 / 07:12 PM EST MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – A group of young people from out of state, who are members of the AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC), are working on a farm for the next month to help with an important initiative. They are working on the One Health Initiative, which is trying to merge human medicine, veterinary medicine and environmental sciences into a proactive, holistic way of approaching solutions, Assistant Team Lead Liam Poitra explained. ... SEE more: https://www.wboy.com/top-stories/farm-project-hopes-to-create-a-learning-and-treatment-retreat-by-teaming-up-with-americorps/

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A One Health issue…How animal abuse is Linked with human violence – The LINK-Letter

January 14, 2020

A One Health issue... How animal abuse is Linked with human violence - The LINK-Letter SEE: http://nationallinkcoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/LinkLetter-2020-January.pdf Provided by: National Link Coalition http://nationallinkcoalition.org/ c/o Phil Arkow, Coordinator 37 Hillside Road Stratford, NJ 08084 856-627-5118 arkowpets@snip.net

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